LeBow Ph.D. Student Wins Research Day Recognition

Story Highlights

  • Ph.D. in marketing student Monique Bell wins 2012 Drexel University Research Day award in Business Research.

  • The annual Research Day event brings together members of the Drexel University community to celebrate research, innovation, scholarship and creativity.

Fourth-year Ph.D. in marketing student Monique Bell has won the 2012 Drexel University Research Day award in Business Research for her proposal titled “Thinking Outside the Building: An Exploration Into Organizational Values and Their Marketing Outcomes.”

Bell’s research will look at firms’ organizational values and their relationships with customer satisfaction and corporate reputation. “I create a new framework for looking at organizational values that considers marketing outcomes – the prior frameworks only considered management outcomes,” Bell says. “Then, I will test whether certain organizational values have different effects on customer satisfaction and corporate reputation. I hypothesize that self-transcendent values (others-oriented values) will increase satisfaction; while self-enhancement values (self-oriented values) will increase reputation.”  

Research Day brings together members of the Drexel University community to celebrate research, innovation, scholarship and creativity. Bell’s advisors for this research project are Pravin Nath, Ph.D., assistant professor of marketing, and Hyokjin Kwak, Ph.D., associate professor of marketing.

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