Winter Term Course Offerings

Winter Term Course Offerings

Business courses
ST: Probability and Decisions: STAT 481 - 001
• Tuesday & Thursday, 10 - 11:50 am
• 4 credit hours
• Cannot be a freshman, minimum grade of C- in STAT 201, STAT 205 or MATH 311
• Approved as: An elective for the Finance major, an elective for the Operations & Supply Chain Management major, an Advanced Statistics elective for the Business Analytics co-major, an elective under the Accounting major, a Quantitative Methods elective for the BS/Business & Engineering degree, a Math elective for the Math Economics concentration under the BS/Economics degree, a Business or Free Elective
This course surveys various decision-making methods as well as decision-making biases, emphasizing the role of probability and elementary mathematics in making good decisions.

For Profit Consulting: MGMT 370 - Section 001
• Mondays, 6:00 pm - 08:50 pm
• 4 credit hours
• Open to Pre-Juniors, Juniors and Seniors
• Approved as a Business Elective, fulfills former BUSN 451 Requirement
Business Consulting allows students to engage with local, national, and global companies, providing business guidance and support. The objective of the course is to allow students to perform as consultants, refine their business skills, and utilize their acquired knowledge from classroom and cooperative education experiences for a hands-on project in a real world setting. In addition to faculty guidance, this course is designed for students to learn from project work and client interaction. MGMT 370 is designed to allow students to work directly with industry leaders - managers and executives, applying their business knowledge to the client’s current business challenges. Class time is used primarily for project work; however, there will also be lectures given by the instructor and case studies covering selected topics of interest.

Nonprofit Business Consulting: MGMT 371 - Section 001
• T/TH, 10:00-11:50 am
• 4 credit hours
• Open to Pre-Juniors, Juniors and Seniors
• Approved as a Business Elective, fulfills former BUSN 451 Requirement
Business Consulting for Nonprofits allows students to engage with local and national organizations, providing business guidance and support. The objective of the course is to allow students to perform as consultants, refine their business skills, and utilize their acquired knowledge from classroom and cooperative education experiences for a hands-on project in a real world setting. In addition to faculty guidance, this course is designed for students to learn from project work and client interaction. MGMT 371 is designed to allow students to work directly with founders and directors of nonprofit organizations, applying their business knowledge to the client’s current business challenges. Class time is used primarily for project work; however, there will also be lectures given by the instructor and case studies covering selected topics of interest in nonprofit administration. The projects in Business Consulting for Nonprofits are team-based. Interdisciplinary teams (students from various majors) will be formed and given the opportunity to work for companies on a business project. The teams are responsible to meet throughout the term on their assigned projects, report accomplishments and discoveries, and strategize with the client. Teams will meet with their clients during and outside normal business hours, as required. The main output of the course is an extensive report and a presentation to the client and instructor documenting the team’s research, results, and recommendations.

Startup Consulting: MGMT 372 - Section 001
• MW, 4:00 pm - 05:50 pm
• 4 credit hours
• MGMT 260 pre-req, fulfills former MGMT 363 Requirement
Startup Consulting provides students with real-world experiences in entrepreneurship. The objective of the course is to allow students to perform as consultants to new companies and entrepreneurs, refine their business skills, and utilize their acquired knowledge from the classroom and cooperative education experiences (if applicable) for a hands-on project in a real world setting. In addition to faculty guidance, this course is designed for students to learn from project work and client interaction. MGMT 372 is designed to allow students to work directly with founders and managers of startup companies, applying their business knowledge to the client’s current business challenges. Class time is used primarily for project work; however, there will also be lectures given by the instructor and the start-up companies covering selected topics of interest in entrepreneurship.

General Education Electives

Special Topics: The Making of Modern India: HIST 298 - Section 002
• TR, 11:00 am - 12:20 pm
• 3 credit hours

Special Topics: History of Commodities: HIST 298 - Section 006
• MWF, 3:00 - 3:50 pm
• 3 credit hours

International Negotiations: COM 362 - Section 001
• R, 6:20 - 9:30 pm
• 3 credit hours
Countries negotiate business deals, military alliances, political issues, etc. The outcomes of these negotiations touch lives of ordinary people on the daily basis. That is why it is very important to understand how these negotiations work and how their outcomes can be theoretically conceptualized and explained. The course will examine theoretical as well as practical elements of the international talks process. Students will be taken into the mysterious world of diplomats and CEOs negotiating trade and security deals and carefully guided through a maze of psychological, sociological, and political aspects that make or break different agreements. By the end of this course they will be able, at least, to understand all the complexity of the whole process as well as to analyze negotiations scientifically and professionally.

Special Topics: Poverty and Income Inequality: PLCY 590 - Section 001
• S, 9 - 11:50 am
• 3 credit hours
This course will examine one of the most important U.S. domestic public policy issues of the decade: poverty and income inequality. The course will begin by examining the concepts and measures used to gauge the distribution of income, earnings, and wealth in the United States and explore the development and evolution of the measure of poverty in the Nation. Next we will explore alternative theories that attempt to understand the underlying nature and causes of poverty and income inequality. The course will also include discussions of public policies to alter the distribution of income and reduce poverty in the U.S. Students will analyze data on poverty and income inequality in Philadelphia and propose a set of policy responses to these problems.