Drexel LeBow Professor Named a Stein Fellow

Story Highlights

  • Daniel Tzabbar, Ph.D., assistant professor of management, named a 2010-2011 recipient of the Louis and Bessie Stein Family Fellowship for Exchanges with Israeli Universities.

  • Tzabbar to travel to Israel to pursue research on his proposed topic, “The Effect of University-Industry Knowledge Transfer on Technological Breakthroughs – The Case of Israel.”

Daniel Tzabbar, Ph.D., assistant professor of management, has been named a 2010-2011 recipient of the Louis and Bessie Stein Family Fellowship for Exchanges with Israeli Universities.

Tzabbar will travel to Israel to pursue research on his proposed topic, “The Effect of University-Industry Knowledge Transfer on Technological Breakthroughs – The Case of Israel,” along with three professors at Israeli universities: Dovev Lavie of Technion – Israel Institute of Technology; Niron Hashai of The Hebrew University; and Barak S. Aharonson of Tel-Aviv University.

Tzabbar and his colleagues will explore university-industry relationships in Israel, examine the degree to which the successful university-industry collaboration was a result of Israel’s ability to benefit from an increase inflow of academic human capital, and most importantly raise the question whether Israel’s position as a source of technological breakthrough is sustainable over time.

Drexel LeBow Dean George Tsetsekos, Ph.D., says the international aspect of this grant is what excites him the most. “It’s important that business professors at top schools such as LeBow add to the global realm of research in business innovation. Danial Tzabbar’s research is going to make a real impact in Israel, and we at LeBow are very proud that he has been named a Stein Fellow.”

Tzabbar says he feels “very honored and privileged to receive the Louis and Bessie Stain Family Fellowship, especially since it will enable me look deeper into the role university-industry knowledge transfer has on entrepreneurial behavior in general, and as a driving force for Israel’s innovativeness in particular. The findings of this study may have strong implication for policy makers in countries, including the United States, that wish to cultivate entrepreneurship and technological innovation as a way to deal with economic downturn.”

Prior to joining academia, Tzabbar worked as a consultant to young entrepreneurial firms in Israel.