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Economics Courses

ECON 201: Principles of Microeconomics

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

What is produced in an economy? How is it produced? Who gets the product? When do markets succeed or fail? To answer these and many other fundamental questions related to the real-world behavior of consumers and firms, this course will teach you how to think like an economist. It will introduce you to economics and microeconomic theory with an emphasis on policy and empirical applications. You will develop skills, insights, and working knowledge of economics that are crucial for successful decisions by consumers, business executives, policymakers, entrepreneurs, and global leaders.


ECON 202: Principles of Macroeconomics

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Examines measurement, growth, and fluctuation of aggregate economic activity. Includes national income accounting and explains determination of output, employment, and price level. Also provides an introduction to international economics, money and banking, and economic policy. Some or all pre-requisites may be taken as either a pre-requisite or co-requisite. Please see the department for more information.


ECON 203: Survey of Economic Policy

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

This course will introduce students to the application of economic principles for a variety of policy-relevant topics covered in more advanced economics classes. Examples of applications may include the analysis of financial and economic crises, mergers, free trade agreements, social security, and unemployment.


ECON 240: Economics of Health Care Systems

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Examine the health care industry from an economic perspective, including demand, cost-benefit analysis, insurance, supply constraints, and the role of the government.


ECON 250: Game Theory and Applications

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Introduces the basic ideas of game theory with a minimum of mathematics; and discuses application to economics, politics, business, behavioral science, philosophy, population biology and engineering.


ECON 270: Using Big Data to Solve Economic and Social Problems

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

This course shows how big data can be used to understand and address some of the most important social and economic problems of our time. The course introduces students to research questions and policy applications in economics and social science in a non-technical manner that does not require prior coursework in economics or statistics, making it suitable both for students exploring economics for the first time as well as for more advanced students. The course will cover topics such as equality of opportunity, education, innovation and entrepreneurship, health care, climate change, tax policy, globalization, and the COVID-19 pandemic. In the context of these topics, the course will also introduce the basics of data science, including regression, causal inference, and machine learning.


ECON 301: Microeconomics

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Examines theory of the firm and theory of the consumer in a rigorous fashion. Also covers risk and uncertainty, price determination, market failures, and analysis of various government policies.


ECON 321: Macroeconomics

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Provides an in-depth introduction to dominant theories behind short-run economic fluctuations and long-run economic growth. Employs both mathematical and graphical tools to discuss determination of output, employment, and price level in the aggregate economy. Also covers effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policies in dealing with unemployment and inflation.


ECON 322: Economics Seminar

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Requires research and writing of a scholarly paper on a topic in economics approved by an appointed faculty adviser.


ECON 326: Economic Ideas

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Covers the history of economic thought and development of different schools of thinking in economics.


ECON 334: Public Finance

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

This course explores the role of government in the economy. Students will analyze the rationales for government policies as well as their implications for equity and efficiency. Much of the course will center on current policy issues related to the national debt, Social Security, education, environmental protection and taxation. Both theoretical applications and empirical findings will be discussed.


ECON 342: Economic Development

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Covers topics including driving forces of economic growth, economic planning, income distribution and poverty, labor migration, capital markets and saving, international debt problems and global economic crisis. Emphasizes underlying theories and realities of economic growth and development of less developed economies and emerging economies.


ECON 350: Applied Econometrics

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Applies statistics to economics, with emphasis on the special problems of statistical analysis of economic data, sources of data, and examples of applications and models. Covers forecasting the impacts of changing economic policy and of developments in industrial markets using economic-statistical models.


ECON 351: Resource and Environmental Economics

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Examines the microeconomic and quantitative aspects of markets for both renewable and exhaustible resources, and the interaction between the energy and resource sectors of the economy and between the productive sectors of the economy and the natural environment, with evaluation of major public policy initiatives and issues in these areas.


ECON 360: Time Series Econometrics

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Introduce time-series econometric models and provide tools for empirical analysis using time-series economic and financial data, with specific emphasis on application and forecasting.


ECON 365: Behavioral Economics

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

This course provides a systematic introduction to behavioral economics, the field aimed at modeling and understanding how individuals make decisions based on psychological and experimental evidence. The course will introduce the main behavioral patterns underlying some of the most important areas of economic decision making. Examples include consumption and saving decisions, choice under risk, as well as social and strategic interactions. Students will also learn the models that try to explain these behaviors and their applications to policy making.


ECON 370: Experiments and Causality in Economics

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

This course covers state-of-the-art statistical techniques for identifying causal effects. Students will study these techniques by applying them to data used in published papers from a variety of fields in economics and social science (e.g. health, labor, environment, business, taxation).


ECON 540: Intro to Econometrics and Data Analysis

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

This course will provide students with a hands-on introduction to econometrics, emphasizing both theory and applications. The applied side of the course will focus on developing students’ data manipulation and programming skills in econometric software. The theory side of the course will cover basic probability theory, hypothesis testing, simple linear regression and multiple regression models.


ECON 548: Mathematical Economics

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

Discusses the application of mathematics in economic models, with extensive discussion of economic applications of calculus and other mathematical tools. Considers implications of the assumptions of maximization of profits and utility. Stresses mathematical models and techniques useful in theoretical and applied applications of economics.


ECON 550: Econometrics

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

This course is an applied course in econometrics for Masters students and covers some statistical tools to understand economic relationships. Economic applications will be discussed and real economic data will be analyzed.


ECON 560: Time Series Econometrics

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

The objectives of this course are to introduce the students to time series econometric models and to provide them with tools for empirical analysis using time series economic and financial data, with specific emphasis on application and forecasting.


ECON 601: Managerial Economics

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

Covers demand and cost analysis, pricing policies, and selected topics of economic analysis as they relate to business policies.


ECON 610: Microeconomics

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

This course develops microeconomic theory with advanced mathematical tools. It covers models of consumer behavior and individual decision making including responses to price and income changes, choice over time, and choice under uncertainty. Students will also learn how technology and cost affect firm decisions, and how consumer and producer behavior interact to determine prices in competitive markets. The course includes applications of microeconomic theory to policy making.


ECON 614: Macroeconomics

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

Provides an in-depth analysis of dominant theories behind short-run economic fluctuations and long-run economic growth. Employs both mathematical and graphical tools to discuss determination of output, employment, and price level in the aggregate economy. Also covers effectiveness of monetary and fiscal policies in dealing with unemployment and inflation. Emphasizes the use of theory to understand past and current macroeconomic events.


ECON 616: Public Finance and Cost Benefit Analysis

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

Introduces market failure as a justification for government provision of public goods and regulation. Covers public choice theory and cost-benefit analysis for public expenditure, impact of taxation on efficiency, incidence of taxes, personal and corporate income taxes, and fiscal federalism.


ECON 639: Applied Industrial Analysis

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

This course will provide students with the theoretical and empirical tools to determine how markets work and to answer a variety of policy-relevant questions. For each topic, students will use real data and court documents to justify their conclusions, so econometrics is a prerequisite for taking the course.


ECON 650: Business & Economic Strategy: Game Theory & Applications

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

This course discusses business strategy in the context of the “game theory” approach to strategic interaction, with additional tools drawn from industrial organization and economic theory. Alternative approaches to pricing strategy, strategic investment, strategies of technological innovation, market entry, and information release; strategy for design of and participation in auctions.


ECON 902: Mathematical Economics

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

The purpose of this course is to provide Ph.D. students with a survey of the basic math tools applied in the study of Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, Econometrics and related areas such as Finance.


ECON 910: Advanced Microeconomics I

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

This course is intended to introduce the student to a rigorous treatment of Microeconomic Theory. Topics include an introduction to choice theory; the representative consumer’s utility maximization problem; and the firm’s profit maximization problem and choice under certainty.


ECON 911: Advanced Microeconomics II

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

This course is a continuation of Advanced Microeconomics I. Topics to be covered include competitive markets, oligopoly model, adverse selection, signaling, screening, moral hazard, the principle-agent problem and auctions.


ECON 920: Advanced Macroeconomics I

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

This course introduces student to the basic tools and structures used in modern macroeconomic research. The course covers basic general equilibrium models of business cycles and growth including two period models: finite horizon models and infinite horizon models in both discrete and continuous time.


ECON 921: Advanced Macroeconomics II

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

This course introduces students to models and techniques used extensively in macroeconomics. While focusing on tools, the course presents and discusses competing theories of monetary aspects of macroeconomic and short-run fluctuations in a closed economy, with several extensions to the open-economy setting.


ECON 940: Econometrics I

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

This course is an introduction to applied econometric techniques beyond Ordinary Least Squares (OLS). Many of the questions that arise in economics cannot be studied using linear estimation methods. Nonlinear estimation techniques will be presented with emphasis on interesting economic questions that can be analyzed using these methods.


ECON 980: Game Theory

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

This course introduces concepts and tools of game theory as they enter into business and economics research. Topics to be covers include Nash equilibrium, games in extensive form and repeated games, together with critical and scholarly controversies about game theory.


ECON 998: Dissertation Research in Economics

Credits: 1.0-12.0
Level: GR

Dissertation Research in Economics.


ECON I299: Independent Study in ECON

Credits: 0.0-12.0
Level: UG

Self-directed within the area of study requiring intermittent consultation with a designated instructor.


INTB 200: International Business

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

This course examines economic, political, legal, and social factors affecting formulation of international business strategy.


INTB 332: Multinational Corporations

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Discusses the role and function of multinational corporations in the global economy, reasons for their existence, and the impact of market structures on the operations of multinationals. Considers the interactions between multinationals and national authorities, and the international transfer of technology.


INTB 334: International Trade

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Examines major issues in international trade and commercial policy. Uses real-world applications to derive and illustrate models of international trade. Covers rationales and benefits of international trade, protectionism, the political economy of commercial policy, international trade and development, and economic integration and world trade.


INTB 336: International Money and Finance

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Examines major issues in international finance and open-economy macroeconomics. Develops models of international monetary interdependence and applies them to real-world examples. Covers determinants of interest rates, balance of payments, international macro policy, restructuring the international monetary system, and globalization of financial markets.


INTB 338: Regional Studies in Economic Policies and International Business

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Study of the industry,trade and macroeconomic trends of a major world region,such as East Asia, Latin America, Europe or the Near East.


INTB 440: Seminar in International Business

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Writing and discussion on advanced topics relevant to International Business. Content is determined mainly by the interests of the students enrolled at a particular term.


INTB 790: International Business Seminar and Residency

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

This course pairs online academic instruction with a one-week international residency. Coursework in international business and on-site cultural immersion enhance studentsâ?? understanding of the global economy and the opportunities and challenges facing companies around the world. The online course component consists of an overview of the economic issues facing the Region and Country(ies) through class discussions, relevant case studies, and group work focused on companies that will be visited abroad. The international residency is a one-week business trip to Country(ies) where students gain firsthand knowledge of conducting business in the region through company presentations, site visits, and cultural experiences.


ECON 248: Mathematical Models in Economics

Credits: 2.0
Level: UG

The purpose of the Mathematical Models in Economics course is to cover basic calculus optimization as applied in economics contexts to prepare students for intermediate level economics courses. While the main tools for the course are obviously math tools, they are math used in business and economic analysis, modeling, and research. The course will go over applications of unconstrained and constrained optimization to microeconomics, macroeconomics, and econometrics and make the connections between the tools we cover and their uses. That will also include both single and multi-variate calculus applications and the conditions for optimality. Economic interpretation of the math is more important than the math itself and the real focus of the course.


ECON 324: Economics of Happiness

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

This course will discuss applications of survey studies of subjective well-being or â??happinessâ? to economics and public policy, with some of the philosophic issues that arise from this.


ECON 621: Business, Government, and Global Macroeconomics

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

The emergence of a globalized and interconnected economy means that adverse macroeconomic events can greatly impact a firmâ??s performance. Witness for example the 2007-08 financial crisis and ensuing recession in the US, or the fiscal crises in Europe. To effectively respond to these risks and opportunities, business leaders need to have a sound understanding of the key economic and institutional factors that affect their firmâ??s environment. Relying primarily on a case-based learning approach, we will study key macroeconomic events and policies that have had widespread implications for society and firms doing business in a country. The experience gained from analyzing these phenomena with a coherent framework will provide managers with a competitive advantage.


ECON 348: Mathematical Economics

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Discusses the application of mathematics in economic models, with extensive discussion of economic applications of linear algebra and calculus. Considers implications of the assumptions of maximization of profits and utility. Stresses mathematical models and techniques useful in statistical applications of economics.


ECON 941: Econometrics II

Credits: 3.0
Level: GR

This course examines advanced topics in time-series econometrics and its application to economic/finance research, unit-root tests, bivariate and multivate co-integration relationships, causality and error correction models, vector autoregression models, and the time-varying heteroskedastic behavior of economic and financial data.


ECON 336: Labor Economics

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Develops an understanding of how labor institutions operate to determine wages and employment. Examines alternative policy questions involving unemployment and inflation, collective bargaining, investment in education and training, and other labor-related questions. Requires students to apply theoretical and empirical abilities to research a labor-related issue and improve the ability to think clearly and communicate effectively.


ECON 338: Industrial Organization

Credits: 4.0
Level: UG

Examines observational studies of industries with respect to competitive or non-competitive structure, conduct, and performance. Considers implications of profitability, technological innovation, antitrust policy, and competitiveness in trade. Reviews problems of measurement and sources of data.


Connect with Us

Thank you for your interest in Drexel's School of Economics. Please contact us for more information. We look forward to connecting with you.

Michele Sykes

Senior Department Manager, Economics and Decision Science

(215) 895-6156

Gerri C. LeBow Hall 1045